Tell USDOT that #WeAllCount

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If someone takes the bus to work, and no one is around to count them, do they still matter?

We say yes, but the U.S. Department of Transportation seems to disagree.

Last week, USDOT issued a draft rule that will govern how states and metro areas will have to measure and address congestion, along with freight movement and emissions. These new requirements will help measure what America’s transportation dollars are actually buying us—which is great. 

However, the rule as it is currently written would measure success in outdated ways. Using old measures will lead to the continued use of outdated strategies, such as prioritizing fast driving speeds above all other modes of transportation and their associated benefits.

Tell USDOT to take a wider view of success and change the proposed rule.

The rule as it is currently written fails to consider people taking transit, carpooling, walking, and biking. It would also penalize communities where people live close to work, or travel shorter distances at slower speeds.

This rule makes driving fast the ultimate goal of a transportation system, regardless of what type of road you’re on. Should driving fast be the priority on main streets where people might be shopping or dining at an outdoor café? Should that be the priority in residential neighborhoods where children might be biking or walking? Of course not.

Success is about a lot more than moving cars fast. Tell USDOT to improve their proposed rule >>

This rule is particularly disappointing in light of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx’s unprecedented effort to improve Americans’ access to economic opportunity through better transportation options. Those are worthy goals, and passing the rule as currently written would be a missed opportunity to achieve them.

Deciding what projects we consider “successful” will influence which transportation projects are selected and built for years to come. Tell USDOT that #WeAllCount and the new rule should reflect that.

P.S.—Want to know more about the new rule? Join us for a free webinar today at 1:00 PM EDT all about it.

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    This entry was posted in Action, Complete Streets, DOT, Featured Content, Federal, Transportation for America and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

    9 Responses to Tell USDOT that #WeAllCount

    1. peter dubois says:

      My street is in downtown Vancouver is posted at 25MPH but folks drive by much faster. This is a neighborhood and the cars and fast speeds are adversely impacting the livability.

    2. Sean Sellers says:

      The rule as it is currently written fails to consider people taking transit, carpooling, walking, and biking. It would also penalize communities where people live close to work, or travel shorter distances at slower speeds.
      This rule makes driving fast the ultimate goal of a transportation system, regardless of what type of road you’re on. Should driving fast be the priority on main streets where people might be shopping or dining at an outdoor café? Should that be the priority in residential neighborhoods where children might be biking or walking? Of course not.
      Success is about a lot more than moving cars fast.
      This rule is particularly disappointing in light of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx’s unprecedented effort to improve Americans’ access to economic opportunity through better transportation options. Those are worthy goals, and passing the rule as currently written would be a missed opportunity to achieve them.

    3. Jessica Stroope says:

      Slow down, DOT! #WeAllCount. I count as I bike with my daughters to school. I count as I ride the bus to work. I count as I walk to the store down the block. Make your measurement include multimodal uses of roads–access to all forms of transportation is a key element of social justice, economic mobility, and our nation’s health.

    4. Brenda Marks says:

      We cannot continue to write rules applicable to the twentieth century (car centric). Please do NOT pass a rule that is based only on cars. It would be outdated before ever becoming law. You must include public transportation, carpooling, cycling and walking.

    5. Neil Davis says:

      The link to the webinar works but it doesn’t have a way to actually sign up.

    6. Hillary Borcherding says:

      Walking is the cheapest, healthiest, and most environmentally friendly way to get to work! Please make it the easiest way as well by prioritizing the needs of walks and bikers!

    7. Robyn Joel says:

      Highways and main streets should not be measured or treated the same. You need to changed the proposed rule and change the outdated ways that you measure success. Not all roads or communities are the same and should not be lumped together as such.

    8. carole l bower says:

      I support smart growth America’s standards and recommendations per We All Count

    9. Ruthann Rudel says:

      There are so many reasons for DOT to re-evaluate their plan for how to measure a roadway’s success. A worldwide shift away from private vehicles and towards sustainable modes of transportation is essential and your assessment methods can either help lead us in a positive future direction of sustainable and pleasant development, or as currently formulated, keep us on a track to bigger faster roads, more cars, more congestion, more obesity, more pollution, more global warming.
      Changing transportation is key to changing all of those, and these assessments must be reconstructed to count and appreciate people taking other, non-car modes, and choosing not to travel at all.
      Please – be in the vanguard! You’re part of the Obama Administration – so act like it! We can do better!

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